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Ecuador regionsThe Andes Mountains, which cross the country from north to south, divide continental Ecuador into four distinct geographical regions:

The Andes / Sierra
The Coast / Costa
The Amazon / Oriente
The Galapagos Islands

Despite its small size, the country boasts 24 different ecological life zones - from tropical rainforest to mangrove swamps to high altitude grasslands called paramo – making Ecuador more topographically diverse than the continental U.S.

Politically and administratively, Ecuador is divided in 22 provinces: 5 in the Costa, 10 in la Sierra, 6 in the Oriente, and 1 in the Galapagos Islands.

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Ecuador
Ecuador
Governmental structure, Ecuador government
 

governmental structure

.ecuador government

Under the 1979 Constitution, Ecuador is a democratic and unitary state with a republican, presidential, elective, and representative government. Although the presidency is mainly a political office, it and the rest of the executive branch are responsible for the governmental process. Congress is responsible for the legislative process. The Supreme Court of Justice, which supervises the Superior Courts, is, along with other judicial organs, responsible for serving justice. Relations between the executive and legislative branches are based on the principle of the separation of powers, although there are several points of contact. In the 1980s, there also have been numerous points of friction between the executive and legislative branches, particularly during the Febres Cordero administration. As political scientist David Corkill observed in 1985, "Politics became locked in a familiar cycle of executive-legislative conflict, protracted political deadlock, and military intervention to break the impasse."

 
Last Updated ( Friday, 29 August 2008 13:45 )